Adventure Time

Looking Back at Adventure Time

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A couple weeks ago, a party was held in Hollywood. It was a wrap party, celebrating the end of production on one of the most important animated series of our time: Adventure Time. The award-winning series is now on its tenth and final season, and in honor of its conclusion it seems fitting to go back and explore the impact the show has had on television animation.

To fully understand the impact of Adventure Time, we need to understand the world of the late naughts, prior to 2010. To put it lightly... those were not kind years for television animation. The three major players - Nickelodeon, the Disney Channel, and Cartoon Network - had only limited offerings. Live-action youth sitcoms were beginning to dominate. Cartoon Network in particular attempted to roll out a programming block in 2009 titled "CN Real", dedicated only to live-action reality programming. Nickelodeon was trying to find something that would stick as well as Spongebob could, but programs like Fanboy and Chum Chum failed to garner strong views. Disney Channel meanwhile had been given over to programs like Jonas and Suite Life; Phineas and Ferb was one of the few noteworthy animated programs near the end of the decade.

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Enter into the scene Pendleton Ward, a graduate from the California Institute for the Arts. In 2006 he made a short titled Adventure Time. By November 2007 it garnered over a million views, having spread around the Internet. Ward took his idea to Nickelodeon and pitched it as a show, but found himself rejected. He then took it to Cartoon Network, where his pitch was accepted. The first episode aired April 5, 2010, to an audience of 2.5 million viewers. From there, the show has continued to receive popularity and praise. Adventure Time has received major nominations every year it has aired, and won several Emmy Awards and Annie Awards. 

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So what is it about Adventure Time that makes it so special? One part of its appeal lies in the wacky off-the-wall world. The main stars are a human named Finn, voiced by Jeremy Shada, and his loyal shape-shifting dog Jake, voiced by John DiMaggio. They encounter characters like an Ice King, a vampire, a lumpy space princess (a blob whose name is literally Lumpy Space Princess), a bubblegum princess, a lemon, a living video game console... and the list goes on from there. It's an environment full of "fun and excitement" and "pure imagination."

At the same time, Adventure Time manages to handle more complex and deeper themes. Characters are not just paper cutouts, but deeper people who we get to explore and discover more about. Critics have praised it for talking about things like mental illness and loss. There has even been an academic interest in the show: for example, Emma Jane published an article in the Journal of Children and Media in which she described the ways that Adventure Time handled gender roles. The balance of wackiness with headiness has helped keep the show entertaining and intriguing for its audience.

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It's a balance, in fact, that has redefined the industry. Adventure Time is often credited with sparking a new television animation renaissance. In fact, alumni from Adventure Time have gone on to make excellent shows of their own. Patrick McHale, a director on the series, went on to create Over the Garden Wall. Rebecca Sugar, a writer and storyboard artist, became the showrunner on the hit series Steven Universe. Ian Jones-Quartey (OK K.O.! Let's Be Heroes), Skyler Page (Clarence), Julia Pott (Summer Camp Island), the list goes on. Besides alumni though, other channels saw the success of Adventure Time, realized that cartoons were still a viable crowd-pleaser, and took a risk on series like Gravity Falls and The Loud House. Everyone wanted to recapture the magic of Adventure Time, and it has led to some truly great works.

With the show's production officially stopped, and the last season airing, it's safe to say that all cast and crew should feel proud for taking part in something so important. Adventure Time has not only inspired fans, but breathed new life into an entire industry. Its impact will not be forgotten, and whatever the crew move on to next will surely be spectacular.

September 2017 Animation News Round Up!

It is nearing the end of the month already, and you know what that means! A round up of a few happenings in animation that September brought our way!

1. Bojack Horseman

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September 8, 2017 was the premiere of Bojack Horsemen Season 4 on Netflix! Said to be a tearfully joyful story about a Horseman who has major depression. How can it be comedic when it's about depression? Well, it is about anthropomorphic animals with clothes and jobs. There's said to be a lot of easter eggs in the show as well, which seems to add to the list of adjectives used to describe this animation. 

Watch the trailer for season 4 here!

 

2. Emmy Awards

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There were so many great nominations for animation at the 2017 Emmy Awards! Bob’s Burgers, “Bob, Actually”, won for "Outstanding Animated Program"! For "Outstanding Short Format Animated Program", Adventure Time, “Islands: Part 4 – Imaginary Resources" takes the win. Seth MacFarlane from Family Guy – ‘The Boys in the Band”, took home the award for "Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance". And last but not least, for "Outstanding Individual Achievement in Animation": Samurai Jack (Craig Kellman, Character Design, “XCII”), Samurai Jack (Scott Wills, Production Design, “XCIII”), Samurai Jack (Bryan Andrews, Storyboard, “XCIII”), Samurai Jack (Lou Romano, Background Design, “XCV”), and Wander Over Yonder (Justin Nichols, Character Animation, “The End of the Galaxy”)!

Read here to see other results from the Emmy Awards, 

 

3. The Lego Ninjago Movie

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The Lego Ninjago Movie was created after the toy series, and was released into theaters last Friday, September 22, 2017. It's running at the 3rd in the box office with 51% on the tomatometer. It has an average rating of 3.6/5 out of 15,887 so far. The Lego Movie had a 96% on the tomatometer and a 4.3/5 out of 221,079, but it's always good to see it to review on your own!

Watch the trailer here!

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4. Walt Disney and Chinese Animation Filmmakers

Disney Animation and various Chinese Animation studio's met for 5 days to exchange ideas! John Lasseter first got the idea when he was asked if he would open a Disney studio in China when he was there on a publicity tour for Big Hero 6. It was Disney's idea and way of sharing their "approaches to filmmaking, production, marketing, distribution and our underlying concept of how to create a healthy and vibrant studio."

Disney Animation and various Chinese Animation studio's met for 5 days to exchange ideas! John Lasseter first got the idea when he was asked if he would open a Disney studio in China when he was there on a publicity tour for Big Hero 6. It was Disney's idea and way of sharing their "approaches to filmmaking, production, marketing, distribution and our underlying concept of how to create a healthy and vibrant studio."

 

5. GLAS Animation Festival/Autonomous LA Program

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The Global Animation Syndicate, otherwise known as GLAS, is a nonprofit organization that dedicates themselves to independent animations. Their first festival was in Berkeley, CA just two years ago, and they had one in LA just yesterday, Thursday, September 28, 2017. Their goal is to advocate independent animation in the United States. This years Autonomus in LA screens films made by the younger generation. 

Check out the line-up here!

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